I highly recommend the live version of this song (available on the Mars ~visitor from the sky~  concert video).
--!Super Cat


 

Kono Daremo Inai Heya De
("This Empty Room")
Music and lyrics by Gackt C.
English translation by !Super Cat

In the silence, you called out to me
When I looked back, you were always close to me
You were just . . . shy
As my fingertips touched you

Beginnings are always sudden
On a street corner, I loved you
You were just . . . smiling
Looking at me so mysteriously

When I saw your slender, broken body
Not even a trace of your gentle smiling face was left behind
If I wake now, it'll take time to explain my tears

Why, in this empty room,
Is my body shaking?
Tell me . . .

That small voice has disappeared completely
But I can't forget that you called my name
If I turn around, just like that time, and you're still there . . .

Why, in this empty room,
Is my body shaking?
Tell me . . .

Why, in this empty room,
Are my tears falling?
Tell me . . .

Why, in this empty room,
Is my body shaking?
Tell me . . .

Why, in this empty room,
Are my tears falling?
Tell me . . .

Please, I just want to hold you again
 

Translator's notes:   In the repeated verse doushite daremo inai kono heya de / namida ga koboreru n darou / oshiete . . .  (Why, in this empty room, / Are my tears falling? / Tell me . . . ), the Japanese word doushite (why) touches the entire sentence, so that a secondary question begins rising up under the verse:  why is this room empty, why is this room empty, why is this room empty? Also, the words daremo inai heya (empty room) specifically implies a room empty of people.

Further notes:    After almost drowning at age five, Gackt began to see (and be terrorized by) ghosts and spirits.  When he was a young teenager, his parents sent him to a psychiatric hospital where he was institutionalized for a year, and spent at least a month in an isolation ward.  It is interesting to note the ways in which the image of a white room, or an empty room, recurs in Gackt's lyrics as a symbol of loneliness  and oppression.